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Ask Me ANY English Grammar Related Question You May Have!

UPDATE! Here you can check out the article where I’ve answered all your questions below!!!

Hello my fellow foreign English speakers!

Are you having any English grammar related questions that have been bugging you for a long time but you just can’t figure out the right answers?

Now you can ask me ANY English grammar related question and I guarantee I’ll answer it in the most detailed and helpful way I can!

Here’s the plan (I just thought of it this morning and personally think it’s a brilliant plan!):

  • You post your question in the comments section below
  • I put ALL of your questions in an article
  • I respond to each and every single one of your questions
  • As a result we’re going to have a massive article on this blog where I’ve answered all your questions!

UPDATE! Here you can check out the article where I’ve answered all your questions below!!!

Just think about it – not only you’ll get your own question answered, but you’ll also bound to come across some other question that’s also going to be really helpful in your particular situation 😉

So please my friend, if you have a couple of minutes to spare – just head over to the comments section below and ask your grammar related question – and remember, no question is too simple!

I’m going to answer them all ❗

Chat soon,

Robby

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Noga

    Thank you Robby 🙂

  • Hi Noga,
    The first sentence sounds much better than the second one!
    That being said, you can use the second one as well, all you have to do is slightly change the words: “According to our agreement with Sara, the requests were submitted for her approval.”
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Noga

    Which sentence is correct
    As per my earlier discussion with Sara,the requests were submitted for her approval
    2-as agreed with Sara,the requests were submitted for her approvals

  • Hi Mona,
    1 – OK, let’s sit on the chair now…
    2 – Let me get you dressed!
    3 – Let me cut your nails
    4 – I’m gonna get your hands washed
    Regards,
    Robby

  • Hi Mona,
    1 – What color?
    2 – Stay right there!
    3 – Let it cool down and then we can eat!
    4 – Yes, “put on your shoes” is correct, and so is “sit on the bed”!
    Regards,
    Robby

  • Hi Ayesha,

    Actually both ways are correct, they’re pretty much interchangeable!

    By the way – you may want to check out this article where I’m showing how to use Google to check whether this or that particular English collocation is correct: http://englishharmony.com/find-the-right-words/ – that way you can check them out yourself!
    Regards,
    Robby

  • mona bilal

    a few more quries
    is it correct 1- ok i’ll make you sit on chair ( talking to kids of 1 or 2)
    2- let me dress you up. 3 let me cut your nails 4- i get your hands washed.
    thanks

  • mona bilal

    Hi robby! while taking to my kids, i confuse which one is corect
    1- what colour is this or which colour is this?
    2- stay back or stay at back or something else ( when i want them not to come to the edge of chair or bed)
    3-let it cool or let it be cooled ( when i want them not to eat hot food)
    4- is it correct ‘put on your shoes’. and sit (or get?) on the bed.
    thanks

  • Ayesha

    Hi robby,
    is it correct to say “that makes me unlike any other girl
    Or should it be unlike every other girl?
    Thanks

  • Well, you could say “You don’t need to be!”, but there’s a better fitting expression for that type of situation – “Never mind!”. Also, you can simply respond by saying “That’s alright!” – people say it all the time.

  • Ayesha

    Hi Robby,
    when somebody says sorry .
    Is it right to say you dont need to be?

  • You’re welcome! 😉

  • Ayesha

    Okay,, thank youuu,, you are awesome!

  • Hi Ayesha,

    You wouldn’t really say “You might be knowing Peter” – it’s an unnatural grammar construct which leaves with number 1 as the correct one – “You might know Peter.”
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Ayesha

    Hi Robby,
    1.You might know Peter
    2.You might be knowing Peter .
    Both same??
    My cousin has already planned . You might be knowing peter . Hes my cousin . Is this usage correct?

  • Thanks.

  • Yes, there’s nothing wrong with the sentence! Obviously, if you go by the super-correct English grammar requirements, you’d have to say “…started off slowly”, but in conversational English it’s totally acceptable to use the adjective as an adverb.

  • Hello, The movie started off slow, but it got better in 30 to 40 minutes.
    Is it correct ?

  • You’re welcome!

  • Ayesha

    Thank you so much

  • Hi Abnita,
    Well, by and large you could argue that “not opening” and “not getting opened” carry pretty much the same meaning, but there are slight differences.
    When you’re saying that something is “not opening”, you’re implying that it’s not possible to open it, that it doesn’t work. When saying “not getting opened”, you’re implying that there’s a particular person involved in the process, so in the case of talking about a website not opening, you don’t actually have to say “not getting opened” because you’re not talking about a specific person opening the website, you’re just referring to the fact that it’s not opening.
    Here’s an example when you would have to say “not getting opened” – let’s say, you’re carrying a large object and you asked a friend of yours to open the door for you. Now, you’re approaching the door, but it’s still closed – so now you could say “What the hell, the door is still not getting opened, what’s going on???”
    Hope this makes sense!
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Abnita

    Hey Robby,

    Which one is right: 1) The web page/site/file is not “opening” or The web page/site/file is not “getting opened”? 2) Main door is not “opening” or not “getting opened”?. Do we need to use “get” with “Open” verb or can we just go with “OPEN” word alone.

    Thanks so much.

  • Hi Ayesha,
    Yes, your sentence is correct, “could” has the same meaning as “was able to” and they can be used pretty much interchangeably!
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Ayesha

    Hey ,,
    is this sentence correct??
    She dint recognise you completely but she *could* guess?
    I assumed could as “was able to”
    Thank you:)

  • Hi Yuki,
    I would personally gravitate towards the second option because you delete something “from” a list not “in” the list. “In’ would rather go with verbs such as “insert” and similar that indicate the opposite action to “delete from”.
    Regards,
    Robby

  • Yuki

    which sentence is correct? Delete this number in your contacts or delete this number from your contacts?

  • Hi SM_Sarban,
    The rule is to use the comma before “but” if it’s followed by an independent clause, basically if the second part still makes sense after dropping the first part of the sentence, there should be a comma before “but”.
    In your sample sentences you should put the comma before “but” because the second parts are sentences in their own right: “You cheated me” and “Why you went to her house?”
    Regards,
    Robby

  • SM_Sarban

    I feel unsure as to when to put a comma before ‘but’. Take two examples:

    I believed in you but you cheated me.
    OR
    I believed in you, but you cheated me.

    I want to know not only how but also why you went to her house.
    Or
    I want to know not only how, but also why you went to her house.

  • Hi Tejeshwar,
    The correct way of referring to Points of Interest is POIs for the simple reason that POI stands for “Point of Interest” thus becoming “POIs” when referring to multiple Points of Interest.
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • TEJESHWAR SHARMA

    SUBJECT: Short form of Points of Interest; POI or POIs?

    Hello,

    I work as a Writer in GIS domain. I want to know the correct usage of short form of Points of Interest; is it POI or POIs? I have google searched it, but, could not find a suitable answer. The usage is not consistent across the board, and some websites use the word ‘POI’ to mean Points of Interest, while others use what seems correct to me, to use the word ‘POIs’ to mean Points of Interest. Can you please provide a resolution?

    Thanks
    Tejeshwar

  • I’m not sure I’m following you. You asked me to provide a sample sentence – and I provided you with a perfect example of how this term “amicus curiae” would be used in real life. Now you’re telling me it means friend of the court – as if the example sentence provided by me would be wrong, which is not the case – I’ve used this term in the way it’s supposed to be used, so if it’s not good enough for you, then sorry, I can’t help you! 😉

  • Abhijith AU

    Amicus curiae means friend of the court, so I want a sentence referring to this meaning. I saw many sentences online but most of them say what u said

  • Hi Abhijith,

    This particular legal Latin term refers to a third party assisting a court case, and typically you’d use this term when referring to the documentation such third party submits to the court, they’re called “amicus curiae briefs” so you’d be saying something like “an amicus curiae brief has been submitted” when referring to the fact of the brief having been handed in.
    Hope this helps!
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Abhijith AU

    I want to get a sentence made using amicus curiae
    Can u give me an example, thanks in advance.

  • Hi Luque,

    Here’s the deal – it’s not necessary to learn exceptions etc. – it only appeals to our curious nature but serves no other purpose than to confuse us.

    Think about what’s going to happen if I gave you a couple of exceptions – next time you speak, you’ll automatically start analyzing your own speech (you’ll be thinking – “Hold on, is this one of those exceptions? Which is the proper way of saying it now?”) and as a result your speech will become super-hesitant and unnatural.

    Instead just accept what you just learned – that you respond by saying “No!” to these type of questions – and that’s it!

    To understand more why I’m having such an opinion, please read this article: http://englishharmony.com/dont-ask-why-questions/
    And by the way – there aren’t any exceptions to those type of questions as far as I can tell! 😉 I
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • luque

    Very interesting. Thanks!

    You mention it’s applicable in pretty much all similar situations when the question involves a negation.
    Are there exceptions/cases in which that is not applicable then? If so, which ones?

    Thank you!

  • Yes, it’s applicable in pretty much all similar situations when the question involves a negation! Btw – on a lot of occasions people will be using the so-called question tags such as “isn’t it?” or “didn’t he?” to end such questions, so in this instance the question would be “There wasn’t anything on sale, was there?” One way or another, it doesn’t change anything about the way you’d answer the question – it’s always “No!”

  • luque

    Would this be applied in other cases that may seem similar then?

    For example, let’s say that there wasn’t anything on sale at a store.
    If someone asks me, “There wasn’t anything on sale, right?”
    Would the correct answer to this question be “No”?

  • Hi Luque,
    The word “right” added at the end isn’t a contradiction to “haven’t”, it emphasizes it so in this case “right” means “no”!
    So the full answer would be: “No, that’s right, I haven’t seen Avatar!”
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • luque

    This is extremely helpful! And glad my friend won’t think I am lying ahah

    However the tricky part is the “right?” at the end of the question. “You haven’t seen ‘Avatar’, right?” By saying “no” isn’t there an implication that the statement is not right (and that I have thus seen “avatar”)? If I had said yes, then that would mean “yes, that’s right, I haven’t seen Avatar.”
    Or maybe am reading too much into it?

  • Hi Luque,
    You’d answer the question by saying “No” and it would imply that you haven’t seen it; nobody would think you’ve seen it! The very question is posed in a way that would only accept “No” as the right answer as it corresponds with the negation “haven’t”.
    Obviously the person asking it already suspects you haven’t seen it and if you were to simply respond to this question by saying “Yes” – it wouldn’t even make sense. If you’ve seen Avatar and you want to CONTRADICT the person’s assumption, you’d have to show it in your response using words such as “actually”, “guess what” or “as a matter of fact” and then followed by “I have”: “Well, guess what? I actually have!”
    Hope it makes sense!
    Robby

  • luque

    Hello, not sure this is considered a tag question, but let’s say I have not seen the movie “Avatar”.
    If someone asks me “you haven’t seen ‘Avatar’, right?”
    If I answer “no” (implying “no, i haven’t seen it”) would it be incorrect? Would the person think I have seen it?
    Technically would the best answer be “yes” or “no” to the question?

  • Hi Karla,
    I’d say “When did you have your first child?” is the proper way of expressing the question.
    You’d use Present Perfect to ask a general question such as “Have you had any children?”, but when it comes to asking questions about specific events having happened in the past – that’s when Simple Past steps in.
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Karla

    Hello. My daughter´s English teacher says that the question: When have you had your first child? is grammatically correct. It sounds wrong to me. Is it right or wrong? Why?

    Thank you!

  • Hi Diane,

    If you look it up on a dictionary website you’ll find out the word “spend” is actually a noun as well: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/spend but I agree – it kind of doesn’t sound correct.

    The thing is – there’s plenty of collocations that sound incorrect at first, but when you look into it you’ll realize it’s how native speakers speak, so we just have to learn them and start using them!

    Here’s another example I can tell you right off the top of my head: “roast chicken”. If you think about it, it should be “roasted chicken”, right? But guess what? Both “roast chicken” and “roasted chicken” are totally valid collocations, so we just have to accept you can say it both ways.

    As a matter of fact, I’ve blogged about similar phrases before, here’s the blog post: http://englishharmony.com/wrong-english-phrases/ – basically it’s all about phrases and words I thought were wrong but then it turned out I was wrong! 😉
    Also, let me just tell you I’m planning to create an article on phrases similar to “roast” and “roasted chicken” – so stay tuned!
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Diane

    I’ve always thought ‘minimum spend’ was grammatically incorrect (as opposed to ‘minimum spending’) but I’ve seen it being used widely in advertisements and promotional materials in recent years. Is this just one of those terms that have become acceptable overtime due to frequency of use? After all, ‘spend’ does not seem to be classified as a noun in dictionaries.

  • Hi Morgan,
    I don’t agree with that – the sentence “I used to think like that” is completely normal and correct!
    Regards,
    Robby

  • Morgan

    I was having a conversation today that went something like this:

    “You thought they owed you something.”
    “I used to think like that.”

    I am being told that my usage of the word “like” in that sentence was grammatically incorrect. Could you please explain it?

  • Hi Rocky,
    This sentence is taken from a different context, it doesn’t make any sense just on its own. Here’s how I’d word it for it to sound normal: “There’s a requirement for a government hospital to have a help desk”.
    Cheers,
    Robby

  • Rocky Mumabi

    ” Government hosptial to have help desk.” In this sentence i am not getting why “to” is put before have. I just want to know the why which rules this sentence is formed.