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English Phrase: Just Because… It Doesn’t Necessarily… It’s Quite the Opposite, Actually!

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Fluent English can ONLY be acquired by learning IDIOMATIC EXPRESSIONS – and that’s why I’m going to highlight them for you in RED!

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT BELOW:

Hi, guys!

It’s Robby here from EnglishHarmony.com and I’m back with another English idiomatic expression. Now, this time around, the expression in question is, “it doesn’t necessarily, it’s quite the opposite actually.”

And to be honest with you guys, this is more than just an expression. It’s actually a whole sentence or the so-called SENTENCE STRUCTURE. That’s how I like to refer to such and similar phrases, which basically constitute entire sentences.

You just have to stick in a few more words and you have a ready-to-go sentence. And, if you are really interested in how this particular sentence structure, “it doesn’t necessarily, it’s quite the opposite actually,” how it can be used in real life, just stick around for a few more minutes and everything is going to be 100% clear to you, my friends!

Example Sentence #1: It doesn’t necessarily mean that I don’t prepare for my videos at all – it’s quite the opposite actually; on quite a few videos I’ve done an awful lot of preparation!

So, welcome back and let me brainstorm the first example sentence. As you may know already, I do everything on the spot here. These idiomatic expression videos, I basically don’t have a list of example sentences in front of me, but I brainstorm everything as I record the video just to show you guys how spontaneous and instant speech happens, right? Okay.

But, it doesn’t necessarily mean that I do all my video recordings spontaneously. It’s quite the opposite actually. On many of my videos that I’ve recorded in the past and published on my YouTube channel, I’ve done some advance preparation, so to speak, right?

So, here, was the first example sentence. “It doesn’t necessarily mean that I don’t prepare for my videos at all – it’s quite the opposite actually; on quite a few videos I’ve done an awful lot of preparation”, right?

That’s the first example sentence. And in this case, the main verb was “mean” basically. “It doesn’t necessarily mean…” And this kind of expression, this sentence structure can be used in situations when you have to express the fact that whatever you’re talking about doesn’t mean a certain thing and that it’s quite the opposite.

Basically, it’s about the meaning. When the meaning is being discussed, you can use the verb “to mean” and insert it into the sentence and then you get, “It doesn’t necessarily mean…”

Example Sentence #2: Just because acquiring some information beforehand is advised, working out at the gym doesn’t necessarily require you to spend days upon days preparing for it, it’s quite the opposite actually!

And here’s another example sentence.

Many people think that in order to start working out in a gym, you have to be instructed in how to use all those machines, and you have to have a very fair idea on proper nutrition, and workout regimes, and how your cardiovascular system works, and your basic anatomy, and everything.

And all those things, basically, you have to spend days preparing for your gym session.

But, just because it’s advised that you spend some time acquiring some knowledge before starting your first workout, right, the gym workout doesn’t necessarily require you to spend a lot of time preparing for it. It’s quite the opposite actually. You can just go to the gym, walk up to the instructor, ask him how to, say for example train your pecs, your chest basically.

Pecs is the industry term, right, and chest is how this body part is commonly known. How to train your chest and triceps for example. You just walk up to the trainer and ask them the simple question, “Please, just show me four basic exercises that I could perform now to train my chest and triceps.” That’s all!

Basically, just because it’s advised that you acquire a certain amount of information before jumping head first into the gym routine, right, just because it’s advised working out at the gym doesn’t necessarily require you to spend days upon days preparing for it. It’s quite the opposite actually!

You can just walk in there and start working out within minutes. So, in this case, you substitute the word “it” for whatever noun is required by that particular situation.

In this case, we are talking about working out at the gym, so that’s how you begin the sentence. Just because blah, blah, blah… Just because working out at the gym requires you to amass a certain amount of information, gym workouts don’t necessarily require… And, in this case, it’s not the verb “to mean,” but it’s “require.” Basically, gym workouts don’t necessarily require you to amass huge amounts of information. It’s quite the opposite. So, in this case, you substitute the word “it” for a specific noun, whatever it was you were talking about, right?

Example Sentence #3: Just because I’m an English fluency mentor, it doesn’t necessarily mean I have a degree in English teaching. It’s quite the opposite actually!

And here’s me brainstorming the third sample sentence. Just because – you see, actually, I just came up with a completely new sentence structure as I was recording this video. “Just because…” “It doesn’t necessarily…” “It’s quite the opposite actually.” So, originally, the phrase consisted of only two parts.

Basically, “It doesn’t necessarily…” It doesn’t necessarily something. It’s quite the opposite actually. But, now, I just came up with just because blah, blah, blah… It doesn’t necessarily blah, blah blah… It’s quite the opposite actually. And this three-part sentence structure actually makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it?

So, let’s go for it! Basically, I’m going to name this video according to this new structure that I just came up with, right? And it actually makes a lot of sense and I think it’s much easier for you to use it in real life if you begin it with, “Just because…” because it kind of initiates the whole thing.

It opens up your mouth and allows you to get your brain onto the right brainwave so to speak, right, if you know what I mean. Basically, this “Just because” bit will allow you to use that phrase in fitting situations.

Okay.

Just because I’m an English fluency mentor, it doesn’t necessarily mean I have a degree in English teaching. It’s quite the opposite actually! I’m not academically tutored to be anyone’s teacher at all, not a single day, right? It’s all self-taught.

Basically, I was dealing with my own fluency issues and, over time, I started publishing articles and giving advice on this blog to other struggling English speakers, and that’s how it all started.

So, basically, just because I have this website and I currently actually teach my own students, right, just because I do all that, doesn’t necessarily mean I have a professional diploma in English teaching, for example. It’s quite the opposite actually! I don’t have any of it and, yeah, that’s about it my friends.

These were the three sample sentences showcasing the sentence structure “just because, it doesn’t necessarily, it’s quite obvious actually.”

And, if you want to be able to use this particular sentence structure in your own speech, what you got to do is do some spoken English practice.

You can even write down your speech, basically brainstorm a few sample sentences, write it all down, then read it out loud a few times, and then gradually, as you read, try to avert your eyes and try to speak off the top of your head.

Obviously, your task is not to memorize every single word just like a poem. But, you have to get the general drift of it and you definitely need to memorize all these words, “just because, it doesn’t necessarily, it’s quite the opposite actually.” Right? And then, in a few months or a year down the line, you will discover that you’ve become a really fluent English speaker provided that you do such and similar phrase acquisition on a daily basis, my friends. Alright?

Thanks for watching this video!

If you have any questions, or comments, or remarks, or whatever, please feel free to publish it all in the comments section below. Thanks for watching and bye-bye!

Thanks for reading,

Robby

P.S. Would you like to find out why I’m highlighting some of the text in red? Read this article and you’ll learn why it’s so important to learn idiomatic expressions and how it will help you to improve your spoken English!

P.S.S. Are you serious about your spoken English improvement? Check out my English Harmony System HERE!

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Comments on this entry are closed.

  • “It’s quite the opposite actually” is used to contradict the statement you’re making. Let’s say, for argument’s sake, you want to explain that just because you don’t like eating carrots, doesn’t necessarily mean you hate all vegetables. So you can finish it off by saying that “it’s quite the opposite actually” which implies that you actually like vegetables in general, it’s just the carrots that you don’t like!

  • Yes Daisy, the sample sentence you posted is spot-on!

  • Daisy

    Is this example right ?

  • Daisy

    Just because he’s travelling around the world, it doesn’t necessarily mean he’s happy with his life. it’s quite the opposite actually.