Funny English Phrases: Work Related Idioms

By Robby

If you are new here please read this first.

Improve Spoken English

Hello my friends from YearOfEnglish.com and also everyone else who happens to be reading this blog post right now!

It’s been a while since I published the last Funny English Phrases video – it was dedicated to sports related idioms and it went live on June 1 which is 3 and a half months ago!!!

The only thing I can say in my defense is that I was extremely busy during the summer working on my new house, and if it’s any good to you, here you can read a couple of English DIY terms I learned as a result of my home refurbishment related activities.

Anyhow, let’s get down to business right now, and let’s learn a couple of work related idioms you can use when communicating with your work colleagues regardless of the industry you’re in.

Whether you’re an office clerk, warehouse operative or a cashier sitting at the till in a supermarket, you’ll find the following expressions quite handy at times, so here’s what you have to do:

  1. Watch the video above;
  2. Listen carefully to the dialogues and REPEAT the phrases you hear;
  3. REPEAT the highlighted idioms a good few times till you can recite them automatically;
  4. USE those idioms in your own role-play conversations!
  5. If spontaneous speech doesn’t come easily to you – create new dialogues in writing and then enact them in real life!

TRANSCRIPT OF THE ABOVE VIDEO:

Idiom #1: I WENT THE EXTRA MILE.

Idiom #2: He’s GETTING THE HANG OF IT.

Idiom #3: John TOOK IT ON HIS SHOULDERS.

Idiom #4: We’re SINGING FROM THE SAME HYMN SHEET.

Idiom #5: He keeps STEPPING ON MY TOES.

DIALOGUE

Worker: Why did you get singled out for praise?

Co-worker: I went the extra distance!

Co-worker: I went the extra mile.

Worker: Yeah, true. I noticed you doing lots of overtime to get the project finished.

“Going the extra mile” simply means putting in more effort than you can get away with!

 

Worker: Jim’s still struggling a little with his new task.

Co-worker: He’s getting the hang of it.

Worker: I’m talking about Jim over there – he doesn’t hang anything!

Co-worker: He’s getting used to his job.

With this phrase, the co-worker means Jim is getting used to his job. Jim is not proficient but is doing an adequate job.

 

Worker: Who is responsible for organizing meetings around here?

Co-worker: John took it on his shoulders.

Worker: Is he OK? That sounds painful!

Co-worker: I’ll contact John to see if he’s available.

This phrase means to take responsibility. Another similar phrase is to say “John took the ball on that one”.

 

Worker: Are we all agreed?

Co- worker: We’re singing from the same hymn sheet.

Worker: We don’t have time for choir practice!

Co-worker: I’m just letting you know we’re agreed!

“Singing from the same hymn sheet” means all present and involved are of the same opinion, or agreed on a plan.

 

Worker: That guy is always sticking his nose in.

Co-worker: He keeps stepping on my feet.

Co-worker: He keeps treading on my toes.

Co-worker: He keeps stepping on my toes.

Worker: That’s right, he’s so annoying!

“Stepping on toes” means getting involved in someone else’s business.

* * *

Remember my friends – make sure to USE those idioms in real life (even if it means doing a role-play with yourself) – simply because nothing works better in cementing such phrases into your vocabulary than SPOKEN ENGLISH PRACTICE ❗

Thanks for dropping by,

Robby 😉

English Idiomatic Expressions

End
  • Can’t say I’d noticed that before – thanks for letting me know!

  • Nickolas

    Hanged is the past tense for execution by hanging, while hung is for other things. This is ripe for pun based jokes.

  • Yes, “we’re on the same page on this” would be pretty much the same!

  • Sergio Rodrigues

    Does “we’re in the same page” have the same meaning of “singing from the same hymn sheet”?