≡ Menu

Start Improving Your Spoken English Today! Sign Up NOW!

FGC Goal #1: American Collocation #9: ALMOST BUT NOT QUITE

Improve Spoken English

Current Goal: Learn 50 American Phrases in 25 Days!

Good morning on this wonderful Saturday morning! 😀

Saturday mornings are ALMOST BUT NOT QUITE the same as working day mornings for me.

I still have to record a video and publish it on my YouTube channel and write a blog post for this blog, so there’s no real difference in terms of my morning routine – getting up at 5:40 AM, having a breakfast, recording a video…

The simple fact, however, that I don’t have to be ready to get into the car at 8:00 AM and go to work makes a world of difference to my mental state!

Not that I wouldn’t be able to motivate myself to do the right things every day, it’s just that when you don’t have to go do work, it almost feels as if there’s something big and exciting going to happen!

You mightn’t even have planned anything in particular for your day off, but it still gives that added dimension to your life!

I, for example, don’t even get to sleep much longer on weekend mornings than on working day mornings; I wake up before 6:00 AM no matter which day of the week it is, yet it’s always easier for me to get out of the bed on a weekend morning for some reason or another.

Anyway, today’s American English phrase is ALMOST BUT NOT QUITE and it’s one of those self-repetitious sayings that don’t necessarily make sense yet they’re handy to use in conversations for the simple reason that they sound good!

You may disagree with me – and you have all the rights to! – but I strongly believe that our English speech (or even our native speech for that matter) becomes more fluent and eloquent if we use all sorts of means of expression – such self-repetitious and seemingly unnecessary phrases included!

Now, I’m ALMOST BUT NOT QUITE sure I’m not going to record the second daily video to post on the Accent Adventure blog, so in case we don’t see each other this evening, I’m saying to you all – “See you in the morning!”

Chat soon,

Robby 😉

English Idiomatic Expressions

Comments on this entry are closed.