Improve Spoken English

You may have this idealistic image in your head as to what kind of English you should be speaking – grammatically super-correct, formal, rich and eloquent English spoken by high-class native English speakers – but achieving and maintaining such high spoken English standards may not be just unrealistic.

It may also be very unhealthy to your confidence as an English speaker to constantly compare your existing level of English against your desired level of English in terms of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and speed at which you speak because it will serve as a constant reminder of your shortcomings as an English speaker!

  • You may believe that most people speak sub-standard English and it’s unacceptable for an intelligent person.
  • You may have this perception that your English just HAS to sound like that spoken by native English speakers – and if it doesn’t, you’ll be always branded as an underachiever.
  • And you may also strongly believe that text-book English taught to English students in schools and universities is the ONLY way forward and that the conversational English is just English for the masses and not for such a well-educated individual as you.

Guess what?

By upholding such unrealistically high standards you’re making it really hard for yourself to actually improve your English!

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Improve Spoken English

About a week ago I asked you to share your stories about embarrassing English conversations on this blog post.

I got a good few comments sharing various experiences, and one of those stories was submitted by a Finnish fella Juhapekka where he shares his experience of having a conversation with a South African chap whose accent, slang and fast speech was indistinguishable.

So the basic issue faced by Juhapekka was dealing with situations when you just can’t understand what your English speaking conversation partner is talking about, and I recorded this video to address this particular issue! ;-)

If you’ve also had similar experiences in the past and it keeps happening to you every now and then that you don’t understand a particular person and you feel very embarrassed about the whole experience – please watch the video above and you’ll find out what exactly you can do about it.

Any questions and comments are welcome! ;-)

Robby

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If you’ve visited my blog at least once, I bet you have some English fluency issues; here are a couple of stories I can share with you so that you fully understand what exactly I’m talking about! ;-)

A few years ago I was looking for a new job, and at that time it was quite popular to hold the first round of interviews over the phone – obviously companies didn’t want to waste their time and effort on candidates falling short of the requirements.

I’ve had had quite a few phone interviews before this particular one, so when I picked up the phone to hear a woman’s voice asking me if I’m free to talk about the direct sales position I was going for, I felt quite confident that I would perform fairly well!

And that’s when it all started going downhill…

For some reason I couldn’t understand (now that I’ve dealt with my fluency issues I actually understand it all quite well!) I just couldn’t find the right words to say.

I started hesitating, I was stumbling upon words, and I was also making all sorts of stupid grammar mistakes although normally my English was fairly good.

It all ended with the interviewer telling me that I should actually improve my English before applying for similar positions…

Needless to say, I was mortified and I felt humiliated! :mad:

And here’s another situation I found myself in a few years ago.

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Improve Spoken English

A good while ago I published a video in which I touched upon contextual English learning and I also provided the opportunity for everyone in that video to do a simple test so that they can see for themselves how effective contextual vocabulary building is as opposed to the traditional way.

Check out that video HERE!

A few days ago I got a comment on that video asking for a good website to learn English vocabulary in context to which I responded by saying that TheFreeDictionary.com is one of the best dictionary websites out there containing a large array of English phrases and collocations which is exactly what you want when learning English contextually.

Yesterday I got another comment by the same person asking how exactly TheFreeDictionary.com website is to be used for the purpose of contextual learning, and so I decided to record this video providing the EXACT instructions on how to look up phrases and expressions containing specific words on that website.

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If you can’t watch the video below – listen to the audio version above! ;-)

Improve Spoken English

There are a lot of ways you can practice your spoken English in situations when you don’t have plenty of opportunities to speak with real people in real life:

There’s another way, however, to get your spoken English practiced in the comfort of your own home while at the same time speaking with another human being.

Namely – speaking with someone over the phone!

But hold on, what if you don’t have any English speaking people you could call?

And surely if you know someone you might call, you wouldn’t be calling them every day now, would you?

And that’s when the utility company support phone lines step in :!:

Basically here’s what you have to do:

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Improve Spoken English

Hello everyone who’s eager to improve their spoken English! ;-)

Has the importance of learning English phrases and expressions ever been brought to your attention?

If you’ve been following my blog for a good while, I’m pretty sure you’re familiar with the concept of natural fluency acquisition via English phrases and idiomatic expressions.

If, on the other hand, this is the first time you’re visiting my blog, let me explain to you in simplistic terms why idiomatic expressions are very important to you as an English student.

Now, let’s take today’s phrase – BROUGHT TO MY ATTENTION.

Imagine yourself having a conversation with someone, and during that conversation you want to say that something has been brought to your attention, in other words – something has been pointed out to you.

If you conjugate the verb “to bring” every time you speak and you create the sentence from scratch in your head while speaking – BROUGHT TO MY ATTENTION – the resulting speech is going to be somewhat slow and hesitant.

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Dealing with fear of Public Speaking

Improve Spoken English

Are you afraid of speaking in public – be it a company meeting, parents meeting at school or a college presentation where you’re required to speak in front of the entire class?

Truth be told – most people are afraid of speaking in public, but to make matters worse, we’re in a situation of being non-native English speakers thus making us even MORE vulnerable to possible hick-ups during the speech!

I mean – where the native English speaker has to deal with anxiety and stage fever, we also have to deal with our English fluency issues which are most likely to get exacerbated while we’re freaking out on the stage or in front of expectant listeners, so I guess I wouldn’t be wrong in saying that dealing with public speaking anxiety is even more difficult for foreigners like me and you!

It shouldn’t deter you from dealing with the issue though, and if you have an important meeting or a presentation coming up soon, please read the rest of this article where I’m going to tell you EXACTLY how to deal with your fear of public speaking by:

  • Accepting and embracing you fear;
  • Preparing for the event by a way of speech automation;
  • Lessening your anxiety through worst case scenario analysis!

So what are you waiting for?

Read this article and deal with your public speaking anxiety in 3 easy steps :!:

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Hello my dear fellow foreign English speakers :!:

In today’s English Idiomatic Expression video we’re going to look at the following collocation: THE WORST CASE SCENARIO.

It’s a way native English speakers (and also fluent foreign English speakers, of course!) refer to the worst possible turn of events, and traditionally we discuss such possibilities when:

  • Trying to persuade someone to do something (Common, why are you afraid to go to the event, the worst case scenario is you being asked a question, and it’s no big deal really!)
  • Discussing the various eventualities and trying to prepare for the worst (So, the worst case scenario is the whole computer network going down, see we need to buy another backup server!)

Want to find out more about this particular English collocation?

Then watch the video above (or listen to the audio just above the video!) and don’t forget to use this new English collocation in your own English conversations!

Regards,

Robby ;-)

English Idiomatic Expressions

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Improve Spoken English

Hello my dear blog readers!

Recently I’ve been getting a few e-mails and also blog comments asking me how it’s possible to develop and improve one’s English if one has very, very little time to do so!

Here’s a typical scenario.

  • You have to get up very early to catch the bus to work, and you’ve virtually no time to do anything in relation to your English improvement.
  • Then you’re working long hours in an environment where there’s no English involved whatsoever, and your working day is really hectic with a couple of quick tea breaks in between.
  • Now, by the time you arrive back home, have your dinner and take a shower, the day is almost over and you have to go to bed to get some sleep before getting up the next morning and starting your 8 AM – 6 PM rat race again.

So, it kind of begs the natural question:

Is it possible at all to work on your English and also improve it considering you’re really, really busy during the entire day and by the time you can sit down in the evening you’re so tired you find it very hard to be motivated to do anything that requires mental exertion?

Well, here’s the simple answer – “Yes, it is possible!”

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Web research into English fluency websites

Improve Spoken English

To be totally honest with you, during the last few years while I’m actively running this blog and also the Accent Adventure website, I haven’t been doing a lot of research into other English language teaching and learning websites.

I have a fair idea as to what’s happening in the industry anyway because I’m actively participating on YouTube and I get to see plenty of English teaching videos published on other channels. I also take part in the YearOfEnglish.com project so I know who the other participants are and what their approach towards English teaching and learning is.

A few years ago I did scour the Web and tried to find other websites to partner up with and to write content for, but soon enough I figured that quite honestly there weren’t that many people out there having figured out that spoken English is the most important aspect of the English language and focus on phraseology acquisition is pretty much the only way forward.

Here are the websites which have embraced the importance of learning phraseology instead of cramming English grammar:

Phrasemix

PhraseMix.com is run by Aaron Knight, and his philosophy is pretty much the same as mine – fluent English can be learned most effectively through real-life phrases and word combinations. Aaron is creating engaging lessons for those who want to learn to use that phraseology, and they’re all illustrated by himself (I often wondered how he does that!).

Tweetspeakenglish

TweetSpeakEnglish.com was created by Nate Hill and the idea behind it quite an interesting one – tweets shared by millions of people are a fairly good representation of real-life spoken English, so phraseology taken from those tweets is used as a source for lessons where you can learn how to use those speech patterns in your English conversations.

Fluentzy

Fluentzy.com where you can buy plenty of books written by Professor Kev Nair and they’re all focused on developing your spoken English fluency – Prof. Kev Nair seems to be one of the few academics having grasped the concept behind true fluency and having realized why a large percentage of advanced English students still struggle to speak fluently. By the way – I found this rare website back in 2008, here’s a blog post I published in relation to that!

And that’s all :!:

Really?

Yeap.

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