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Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

Hi guys, today I’m bringing you yet another English idiomatic expression, and this time around it’s a super handy sentence starter:

I HEARD SOMEWHERE THAT…

Why am I saying it’s a super handy sentence starter?

Well, the reason behind that is simple enough – it’s a perfect way of starting a conversation with someone about something that you’ve heard somewhere, which is what a lot of conversations are all about!

Let’s say, for argument’s sake, you want to tell your work colleague that there’s way more bacteria on the average mobile phone than on a toilet seat.

In theory, nothing could be easier than that, right?

Just open your mouth and tell him about it!

In reality, what a lot of foreign English speakers will struggle with is – HOW TO START THE DAMN SENTENCE!

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Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

Video Transcript Below:

Hi guys, it’s Robby here from EnglishHarmony.com and welcome back to my video blog!

In today’s video we’re going to discuss the correctness of the English language.

And the fact of the matter is that there’s so many things that we say in our English conversations that would be considered as incorrect if we went by the textbook English grammar rules. And if you paid particular attention to the last sentence – I said something incorrectly!

I said “there’s so many things” whereas in reality I should have said “there are so many things” because the noun “things” obviously is in plural in this case so the verb “to be” should have been conjugated to reflect that, I should have said “there are so many things”.

And this is just one of those examples where something that’s incorrect, it has been accepted in the general public and everyone speaks like that and there’s nothing wrong with it.

So it begs the question and as a matter of fact this particular phrase “it begs the question – to beg a question” has also been criticized as being incorrect English, right? In reality we should say “it raises a question”. But this phrase “it begs a question” is also used by everyone. And I would say that it actually makes it correct.

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English word of the day

Here’s how to improve your spoken English when reading this article: read it out loud, then read out loud the collocations highlighted in red 10 times each to memorize them, then look away from the monitor and try and say 3 sample sentences for each of those collocations! For best results record your speech so that you can go back, spot any mistakes you might have made, and then do some more spoken English practice by correcting yourself!

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I’m sure you’re familiar with the concept of the “word of the day”, right?

Every dictionary website on the Net has such words featured as a way of encouraging English learners worldwide to acquire new English vocabulary.

Well, on the surface it looks like a great idea, and you may be under the impression that the more English vocabulary you know, the more fluent you’re going to be, so you’re singing up for such words being delivered to your inbox every day and you’re feeling like you’re really contributing to your English skills.

In reality veteran English learners like myself will tell you right off the bat that learning new vocabulary words alone isn’t going to cut it.

You’ll be just stuffing your brain full of some obscure English words with little to no opportunity of using them!

Let me illustrate my point by doing a quick Google search for the term “word of the day”. Here’s what words are coming up:

  • Pulchritude
  • Biophilia
  • Castellated

There’s only one thing I can say – WTF?!?

When, tell me when are you going to use such words? WHEN?!?

NEVEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEER!!!

Such vocabulary building serves no practical purpose whatsoever – unless, of course, you’re doing it so that you can annoy everyone around you by saying things nobody has a clue about!

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Job Seeking for Foreigners

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NEW! How to Prepare for a Job Interview In English – watch Video HERE!

Are you a foreign English speaker and you’re fed up with your current situation at work and you’d really love to change jobs?

Are you already preparing for a job interview and you’re anxious to make the best impression possible?

Or maybe you’re in the process of creating a CV so that you can start applying for relevant positions?

Whichever is the case, you may want to make sure you’re using relevant job-seeking related phrases and expressions! If you do so, you’ll definitely increase your chances of getting picked for the position because you’ll sound just like your native English speaking counterparts.

So without further ado, let’s get down to business and see exactly what smart English phrases you should use in your CV and during your job interviews!

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Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

Hello my friends foreign English speakers!

It’s me – Robby – from English Harmony here and this time around I’m bringing you another English idiomatic expression, namely – “SPEAKING OF…

As a matter of fact, this expression also happens to be one of the simplest English sentence starters and the only other sentence starter that can rival this one in its simplicity is “Well…”

Long story short, whenever you’re asked a question and you find it a little bit difficult to respond, you can resort to the strategy of saying “SPEAKING OF… which then is followed by the very subject of the question.

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Guessing English vocabulary word meanings

Here’s how to improve your spoken English when reading this article: read it out loud, then read out loud the collocations highlighted in red 10 times each to memorize them, then look away from the monitor and try and say 3 sample sentences for each of those collocations! For best results record your speech so that you can go back, spot any mistakes you might have made, and then do some more spoken English practice by correcting yourself!

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May I ask you a question – what do you do when seeing an unfamiliar English word?

Here’s what people normally do:

  • Look up the new word in a dictionary
  • Ask someone what it means
  • Forget about it and only look it up if seeing it for the second or third time

But have you ever tried to GUESS the meaning of the unfamiliar word?

Well, not that many people try to do that, but it’s worth to give it a shot!

Don’t be immediately looking up the meaning of the new word, try and think a little bit if you can find any connection between the new word and some other English word that you’re already familiar with!

Let’s imagine for second that you’re not familiar with the following word – “enclosure”.

If you just tell yourself – “I haven’t got a clue what “enclosure” is!” – it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy and you’re not going to figure out what it means simply because you’re not even trying to do it.

If, on the other hand, you’re thinking along the following lines: “Hold on, “enclosure” – it might have something to do with the word “close”, right? So there’s a good chance it defines something that is closed…” – you’re opening your mind and tapping into your brain resources.

This type of thinking will develop a more thorough understanding of the English language and its vocabulary and will provide a small boost in all areas of your English development – comprehension, reading, and speaking.

And on top of that, I truly hope that this article will serve as an eye-opener and make you realize that a lot of English words are related! 😉

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Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

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Video Transcript Below:

Hi guys, hello boys and girls, hello my dear fellow foreign English speakers and welcome back to Robby’s English Harmony video blog!

Today guys I wanted to share something with you. A revelation that I had when I was driving in the car to college this morning, right? As it always happens I was speaking with myself practicing my spoken English. As you may know by now that’s how I roll, that’s how I maintain a high standard of my English fluency.

And I was thinking about the fact that so many of us foreigners are trying to speak too fast, okay? And it’s a mistake number one that I come across time and time again whenever I start teaching a new batch of Fluency Star students I witness the same thing again and again. People are trying to speak too fast, okay?

And I’ve written about it in the past, obviously years ago I wrote a blog post about not comparing yourself with others. And back then I knew only too well that the desire to speak just like the other person does is the biggest pitfall for you guys, right? That’s when you start comparing yourself with the other person and that’s what brings about all these fluency issues. If you didn’t have the comparison in place and you only focused on your own performance, it would be so much easier, so much better to maintain your fluency and to work on your spoken  English, right?

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English sentence starters ending with IS

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Here’s how to improve your spoken English when reading this article: read it out loud, then read out loud the collocations highlighted in red 10 times each to memorize them, then look away from the monitor and try and say 3 sample sentences for each of those collocations! For best results record your speech so that you can go back, spot any mistakes you might have made, and then do some more spoken English practice by correcting yourself!

As you may already have noticed, spoken English and written English are different in that you don’t really speak the way you write.

In written English, you have plenty of time of constructing well thought-through sentences, whereas when you speak, you have to produce INSTANT speech, which, when put on paper, will seem a bit chaotic.

And here’s a typical example.

Imagine you have to explain some concept, for example – how the Internet works.

Here’s how you’d do it in writing: “The Internet is a global network of computers consisting of servers as well as personal computers.”

But here’s how a native English speaker would explain the workings of the Internet in spoken, conversational English: “What it is, is a global network of computers…”

Did you notice anything weird about it?

The word IS is being repeated twice which may seem incorrect at first, but the fact of the matter is that it’s totally acceptable in spoken English, it’s used as an intensifier and is also known as the double copula. Just read that sentence out loud and pause at the comma – you’ll feel that it’s actually necessary to repeat the word IS!

Also, if you look at the way the sentence starts, you’d think it’s a question – I mean, it’s the questions that would typically start with words such as WHAT and WHY, right?

There you go!

It’s about time you learned that spoken English allows you to use words differently and in this article I’m going to show you really handy ways of starting sentences when you have to provide an explanation of some sorts.

And please bear in mind that I’m not telling you to use these spoken English grammar structures just for the sake of it.

Try them out for yourself, and you’ll realize that it’s much EASIER to speak this way ❗

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Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

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If you were to find out I live in Ireland, which is an English speaking country, would you automatically assume all the credit for my fluency goes to me living among native English speakers?

Well, guess what?

Nothing could be further from the truth!

I’d say that 90% or my success as an English speaker can be directly attributed to constant spoken English self-practice and if you doubt that – just check out this link HERE where my blog visitors and customers are providing hard proof that spoken English self-practice works indeed!

You see, the way I see it, the major problem that we, foreigners, have is that most of us live in foreign countries where English isn’t spoken on the street.

As a result you may be under the wrong impression that it’s next to impossible to become a fluent English speaker when living abroad.

I say – it’s just an excuse!

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Improve Spoken English

Here’s how to improve your English listening skills when listening to my video: put the headphones on, playback the video and write it all down while listening to it!

Video Transcript Below:

Hi guys, hello boys and girls and welcome back to Robby’s English Harmony video blog!

Listen guys, I’ve had a crazy week and that’s the reason why I haven’t responded to your blog comments in case you’re wondering where has Robby gone, why he isn’t responding to the blog comments that I’ve made, right? Rest assured, I’m going to do it right now.

I just came home from college today and to be honest with you, college ends a bit sooner on Friday so that’s a good thing. I can catch up on the things that I haven’t done during the week. And to be honest with you, I’m very busy with my Fluency Star students so that takes up pretty much my entire time and I have very little time left for dealing with the comments and your emails and so on and so forth.

So I’m really, really sorry for not being able to get back to you sooner but now I’m going to rectify that mistake and I’m going to respond to one person’s comment, Indrajeet’s comment. And he commented on my blog post a couple days ago there. And his comment definitely merits a video response. So I’m going to read it out so you can clearly see what the whole thing is about, right?

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