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We’re All Capable of Correcting Our English Speech Ourselves!

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One of the biggest misconceptions I’ve ever come across over the years is the following:

You can’t engage in spoken English self-practice because there’s no-one to correct your mistakes!

I’ve received feedback of such nature from quite a few of my fellow foreign English speakers, and it clearly goes to show that the average foreigner is so afraid of making mistakes and letting them go unnoticed, that they’d rather remain unable to speak fluently!

In today’s video I’ve debunked this myth, and here’s exactly what you’ll find out if you watch the video above:

  • Why ANY foreign English speaker is very well capable of spotting their own mistakes;
  • Why it’s not important to spot ALL your mistakes when speaking;
  • The single most effective method of using Google to correct your English mistakes;
  • How you’ll deal with 99% of your mistakes over a longer period of time despite dealing with just a few at any given time!

So, my dear fellow foreign English speaker from YearOfEnglish.com, are you really serious about your ORAL ENGLISH FLUENCY?

Writing, comprehension, reading and listening is all right, but I’m pretty sure that when it comes to SPEAKING in English – that’s when you’re experiencing the biggest challenge, isn’t that right?

Don’t despair!

Rely upon your own intelligence to spot and correct your own English mistakes! After all – in real life conversations other people won’t correct your speech the whole time anyway ❗

Chat soon,

Robby 😉

P.S. Would you like to find out why I’m highlighting some of the text in red? Read this article and you’ll learn why it’s so important to learn idiomatic expressions and how it will help you to improve your spoken English!

P.S.S. Are you serious about your spoken English improvement? Check out my English Harmony System HERE!

 

English Harmony System

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Why don’t you use inverted commas?

    “many a mile” or “many miles”?

  • ‘Many a mile’ and ‘many miles’ – same thing, you can use whichever one you wish; ‘many a mile’ just sounds a bit more poetic.

    ‘Kind of a tough task’ is the correct phrase – just like ‘smoking is kind of an addiction’ is.

    The only thing you have to remember is to follow up ‘kind of’ with the indefinite article ‘a’ if you’re going to use a noun, that’s all!

    Regards,

    Robby

  • rahul

    I apologize if my post bugged you. But I am seriously confused about what type of structure is used in what condition?

  • rahul

    Though I second you on fluency issues, the above logic may not apply to writing. I will be taking two English exams having writing sections very soon.

    What I asked is:
    Which of the following is correct.

    1) Many a mile or many miles

    2) kind of a tough task or a kind of tough task, for that matter a tough task or tough a task

    3) smoking is kind of an addiction or smoking is a kind of addiction

  • I don’t really get your question. You doubt me – but in what respect do you doubt what I’m saying in this video? My point is – once we have a good grasp of the basics of the language, we are perfectly capable of correcting our own mistakes.

    As for the examples you’ve mentioned in your comment – please refer to these articles where I’ve discussed in the very depth why asking questions like you’ve asked isn’t going to result in any improvement to one’s fluency: http://englishharmony.com/analysis/ and http://englishharmony.com/dont-ask-why-questions/

    Basically the point is – don’t focus on rules, you don’t need to know the rules! All you need to know in order to speak fluently is what to say at a particular moment in time, that’s all! If you want to say ‘many a mile’ – say it! If you wan to say ‘many miles’ – it’s fine too! Once you know these speech patterns, you don’t need to know WHY they’re said in this particular way and what are the rules governing their usage.

    If you’re trying to analyze your language in such a detail, it’ll drive you nuts and you won’t be able to speak fluently, that’s what I’m talking about in nearly every single article and video on my blog so please read the above articles to see what exactly I’m talking about here.

    Regards,

    Robby

  • rahul

    1 doubt Robby. I have seen 2 usages of “kind of”. like kind of a tough task as well as a kind of tough task, many miles or many a mile…What rules are these usages are dictated by?

  • Hi Raja,

    Are you asking the question about the English Harmony System? It costs $67 and you can find more details about it here: http://englishharmony.com/improve-spoken-english.php

    Regards,

    Robby

  • Raja

    Dear Sir, good afternoon, can u let me know plz how mucn it will cost? I m from India.